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Author Topic: Bow Legs & Knock Knees Correction  (Read 45768 times)
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Ladisten
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« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2009, 11:27:34 AM »

I didn't know osteotomy was part of this. Is osteotomy always done in knock knee correction?

Thank you for clarifying what you meant by "muscle correction". I thought you meant surgery on the muscle tissue. I'm relieved to know that is not part of the surgery!

I am most interested in the therapeutic value of this surgery. I have looked at some articles available on the internet but they are written for doctors and I don't really understand them. Would you comment on this? Is there pain relief for instance? Lessening of ostoarthritis? Any other benefits?

Thank you
all that you have mentioned gives the correction: pain relief (knee and back pain often connected with it), lessening or preventing of ostoarthritis. And, of course,
better functionality, ease with training and exercising and straight legs.

Depending on severity of the problem we either do cortical cut or osteotomy, correct.

Let me know if any further questions,
L
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Ladisten Clinic
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« Reply #21 on: June 05, 2009, 09:11:47 PM »

Thanks for this information. What is the difference between a cortical cut and an osteotomy?
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Ladisten
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« Reply #22 on: June 07, 2009, 08:14:06 PM »

Thanks for this information. What is the difference between a cortical cut and an osteotomy?
Hello,Thanks for asking.


this is something that is a question /bother of surgeon what shall be done to achieve best results, basically speaking it is full or not full cut of the bone.
This is a special type of osteotomy where only the cortex of the bone is cut (outer shell of bones).

Thanks,
L
« Last Edit: June 07, 2009, 08:41:04 PM by Ladisten » Logged

Ladisten Clinic
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hialeah
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« Reply #23 on: June 10, 2009, 05:22:36 PM »

Hi Ladisten,
In my internet research I have read that osteotomies last for only 5-10 years and then a total knee replacement is needed. Some of this information was old. Is this still the case?
Thanks!
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« Reply #24 on: June 10, 2009, 05:36:41 PM »

Hi Ladisten,
In my internet research I have read that osteotomies last for only 5-10 years and then a total knee replacement is needed. Some of this information was old. Is this still the case?
Thanks!

Where did you read that? It makes no sense at all. An osteotomy is a cut, so what do you mean that it lasts for only 5-10 years? I think that you probably confused yourself with something.

Please post the link to what you're talking about...
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« Reply #25 on: June 10, 2009, 06:06:12 PM »

Hi MMT
Thanks for your inquiry, it's a good question. Here are two sources I found on the internet. It's why I posted my question.

http://orthopedics.about.com/od/hipkneearthritis/a/osteotomy.htm - 26k

http://www.eorthopod.com/public/patient_education/6518/tibial_osteotomy.html
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« Reply #26 on: June 10, 2009, 06:14:28 PM »

Hi MMT
Thanks for your inquiry, it's a good question. Here are two sources I found on the internet. It's why I posted my question.

http://orthopedics.about.com/od/hipkneearthritis/a/osteotomy.htm - 26k

The relates to surgery for people suffering from degenerative arthritis, where it is used a replacement to knee replacement. That has nothing to do with cosmetic LL or correction

Quote

This second is as a solution to osteoarthritis in the knees.

These are procedures for treating specifical medical conditions.

If you are suffering from arthritis or osteoarthritis, then you should go and see your doctor who can help you to resolve them. It is not a matter of bowing correction, which is primarily cosmetic.

Are you suffering from osteoarthritis?
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« Reply #27 on: June 10, 2009, 09:30:55 PM »

The relates to surgery for people suffering from degenerative arthritis, where it is used a replacement to knee replacement. That has nothing to do with cosmetic LL or correction

This second is as a solution to osteoarthritis in the knees.

These are procedures for treating specifical medical conditions.

If you are suffering from arthritis or osteoarthritis, then you should go and see your doctor who can help you to resolve them. It is not a matter of bowing correction, which is primarily cosmetic.

Are you suffering from osteoarthritis?

Hi MMT,

No I don't have OA at this time. I understand what you're saying though. However, I couldn't find any followup studies of patients who underwent osteotomy who had no knee disease. Only followup studies such as the two I posted here. Perhaps it makes a difference if an osteotomy is performed on a healthy knee vesuse and unhealthy knee. I would like to know either way.
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« Reply #28 on: June 10, 2009, 11:18:43 PM »

Hi MMT,

No I don't have OA at this time. I understand what you're saying though. However, I couldn't find any followup studies of patients who underwent osteotomy who had no knee disease. Only followup studies such as the two I posted here. Perhaps it makes a difference if an osteotomy is performed on a healthy knee vesuse and unhealthy knee. I would like to know either way.

You're really confusing yourself here. You have looked-up information about correcting knee deformities.

Bowing is not a knee deformity, it is an alignment issue.

Osteotomy is a general term for making surgical cuts in the bone, so it makes no sense in the context of what you're talking about.

Take a deep breath and listen to what Ladisten is telling you. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing Wink
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Ladisten
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« Reply #29 on: June 11, 2009, 08:12:52 PM »

Hi Ladisten,
In my internet research I have read that osteotomies last for only 5-10 years and then a total knee replacement is needed. Some of this information was old. Is this still the case?
Hi, I am not sure I understand the question. What do you mean "osteotomy lasts"?
It is cutting, it cannot "last" - it's a procedure of cutting the bone.
Let me know if any questions that relate your condition/problem. Thanks.L
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Ladisten Clinic
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Ladisten
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« Reply #30 on: June 11, 2009, 09:14:55 PM »

Hi MMT,

No I don't have OA at this time. I understand what you're saying though. However, I couldn't find any followup studies of patients who underwent osteotomy who had no knee disease. Only followup studies such as the two I posted here. Perhaps it makes a difference if an osteotomy is performed on a healthy knee vesuse and unhealthy knee. I would like to know either way.
Ok, I probably know what you're referring to. Let me explain.
Typical 2 cases of correction of bow legs / knock knees:
1. Patients that do not like the appearance of the legs. No pain yet, only aesthetic reasons are guided by patients.
2. Patients that already start to feel discomfort while walking/training. They may experience knee or back pain.
Malalignment present while bow legs (genu varum) or knock knees (genu valgum) causes uneven pressure onto the outer and inner part of knee-joints, that has been proved to lead to their quick wear, early developed arthrosis, as well as to pain and progressing deformation.
Recently one of our patients who already had difficulties walking (was moving in a wheel chair due to pain) after corrective treatment left the clinic on fully functional legs.

In both cases #1 and #2, correction of alignment will help - whatever was the initial/main reason for correction - aesthetic or functional, patients have both them resolved.
Because #1 category of people may not experience pains or knee problems...YET. We will help them lack/postpone problems associated with reason #2 -pains and joint wear-out.
Comparing to other people with no bow legs or knock knees, chances of knee joints problems are much higher with stated diagnoses.

One thing that I suppose you need to know -we do not interfere with knee joints, so no worries correction will cause knee joint problems. We work with tibia/femur below/above the knee joint.
Hope I answered your question. Let me know if unclear.L

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Ladisten Clinic
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Ladisten
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« Reply #31 on: June 11, 2009, 09:31:42 PM »

You have looked-up information about correcting knee deformities.
Bowing is not a knee deformity, it is an alignment issue.
Hello, MMT.
According to what Wikipedia tells us, and also some docs in orthopedics, a varus deformity (aka bow legs, O-shaped legs) is a "term for the inward angulation of the distal segment of a bone or joint. The opposite of varus is called valgus" (X-shaped legs, genu valgum). Hope this helps too.
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« Reply #32 on: June 11, 2009, 09:45:59 PM »

Thanks, Ladisten.

I'm glad that we have this forum to help people understand things properly; it's easy for them to get confused with things they read on the Internet Smiley
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Ladisten
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« Reply #33 on: June 11, 2009, 09:51:41 PM »

Thanks, Ladisten.

I'm glad that we have this forum to help people understand things properly; it's easy for them to get confused with things they read on the Internet Smiley
I am also glad we have this forum :-). Thanks much, MMT for helping MMT users!
All the best, L
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Ladisten Clinic
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Bruce
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« Reply #34 on: June 11, 2009, 11:31:43 PM »

Hey Lad i have a question for you. Lets say someone has Super-bowed legs and in your estimate they would probably gain at least an inch in height, would the fibula also need to be lengthened at least 1cm or 2?
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« Reply #35 on: June 12, 2009, 09:20:19 AM »

Hey Lad i have a question for you. Lets say someone has Super-bowed legs and in your estimate they would probably gain at least an inch in height, would the fibula also need to be lengthened at least 1cm or 2?

Hello Bruce,

How goes it?
While correction of bow legs we do not cut the fibula - it is not deformed. So it remains how it was, of the same length - this bone is very flexible and movable, unlike tibia and after you grow let's say 1 cm with corrected alignment, it just places in the most convenient position and remains there.
Let me know if further questions, Bruce. L
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« Reply #36 on: June 12, 2009, 01:38:49 PM »

Ok, I probably know what you're referring to. Let me explain.
Typical 2 cases of correction of bow legs / knock knees:
1. Patients that do not like the appearance of the legs. No pain yet, only aesthetic reasons are guided by patients.
2. Patients that already start to feel discomfort while walking/training. They may experience knee or back pain.
Malalignment present while bow legs (genu varum) or knock knees (genu valgum) causes uneven pressure onto the outer and inner part of knee-joints, that has been proved to lead to their quick wear, early developed arthrosis, as well as to pain and progressing deformation.
Recently one of our patients who already had difficulties walking (was moving in a wheel chair due to pain) after corrective treatment left the clinic on fully functional legs.

In both cases #1 and #2, correction of alignment will help - whatever was the initial/main reason for correction - aesthetic or functional, patients have both them resolved.
Because #1 category of people may not experience pains or knee problems...YET. We will help them lack/postpone problems associated with reason #2 -pains and joint wear-out.
Comparing to other people with no bow legs or knock knees, chances of knee joints problems are much higher with stated diagnoses.

One thing that I suppose you need to know -we do not interfere with knee joints, so no worries correction will cause knee joint problems. We work with tibia/femur below/above the knee joint.
Hope I answered your question. Let me know if unclear.L

Yes this is what I am referring to. This is good information thanks for providing it. You sound like you pay close attention to the orthopedic part even if the patient has the procedure for cosmetic reasons. If so, I am impressed.
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Ladisten
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« Reply #37 on: June 12, 2009, 02:04:18 PM »

Yes this is what I am referring to. This is good information thanks for providing it. You sound like you pay close attention to the orthopedic part even if the patient has the procedure for cosmetic reasons. If so, I am impressed.
Ok, if you have any more questions please let me know. I may also directly contact our clinic's surgeon if you have some specific questions and you will have immediate response. Thanks,L
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Ladisten Clinic
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« Reply #38 on: June 21, 2009, 09:17:08 PM »

Some more news.

Severe case of bow legs, caused by Vitamin D resistant Rickets.
First, femur and tibia curvature on one legs were fixed.
Then a bit later - on another leg, and the same type of corrective surgery took place.


One of legs is being corrected.


Both legs are straight.
He is very nice boy. Little angel  Smiley If you saw him you'd agree.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2009, 10:32:50 PM by Ladisten » Logged

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« Reply #39 on: September 28, 2009, 10:24:09 PM »

Hi Ladisten

I have been considering having surgery done for some time now but still need to feel i will be safe going to Ladisten.

Can you please answer some questions i have?

1. As i have young kids i cannot stay longer the 2/3 weeks.  Will i have to find a doctor that can check my progress here in Ireland? will i need a wheelchair for at home? or will cruch do after 2/3 weeks?
2. How will i know what excrises i will need to do for the remaining weeks or do i need to see a physo therapist at home?
3. How long after can patient drive a car?

Thank you
Tan
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